Run Lighter And Reduce Running Injuries – Running Workshops

Do you want to run lighter and reduce the risk of running related injuries?

Whether you are into parkruns, marathons, short distance running, trail running, road running, obstacle course races the way you run will impact your body instantly.

Shin splints, knee pain, lower back pain, shoulder and upper body pain they are all related to your running form, to how you use your body.

Thus join our running technique workshops in London and train like an athlete.

Watch the video to understand what you will do and learn on the day.

Also please share around. Looking to pass down this knowledge to as many runners as possible.

EARLY BIRD TICKETS are available for the January and February workshops.

 

Running Technique – Matching Cadence And Breath For Long Distance Running

When talking about how to breathe when running we need to look at how to match the breath to our cadence. When we achieve that breathing is not a problem anymore.

So many people who take up running say they have to stop because they can’t breath anymore, although their legs are ok. The problem is not fitness, not always at least, but their breathing rhythm.

They might go really fast at the beginning, breathing being chaotic, and they burn out faster. Then they have to stop to catch their breath.

The idea is that, no matter the cadence you’re at, it’s slower if you are a beginner for example, match your breathing to your cadence. Then you can go as far as your legs will take you, and as fast as well.

On the same topic I talked about in the previous video: Breathing Struggles When Running

I explain in more detail in the video. If you wish to attend our dedicated running workshops email support@themtechnique.com or book a free consultation, 

Running Technique – Breathing Struggles When Running

Over the past 3-4 years I’ve been working with a number of runners and one of the most common struggles are related to breathing patterns and rhythm. Every running has questions regarding this.

How should I breath when running?
Is there a rhythm?
How do I breath in through the nose if I can’t get enough oxygen in?
How do I keep the rhythm? I lose it after a while

In the 6 min video below I attempt to address all these questions and suggest several solutions. If you have a health condition that can be made worse through deep breathing or breathing exercises talk to your doctor before applying the ideas in this video.

The struggles identified:

– can’t take in enough oxygen through the nose
– can’t keep the same rhythm of breathing through the nose for a long time
– nose hurts when breathing through the nose in winter (because it’s cold)

 

Some of the solutions discussed in this video:

 

1. Correct breathing rhythm through the nose

To begin with I suggest the following rhythm:

2:2 – 2 in breathes, 2 out breaths
For practice and to increase lung capacity you can take it up to 10:10 and then down to 2:2.
Eventually you want a 2:3 pattern or 4:3 (breathing out one longer than in). This is because you want to avoid the first out breathe to fall on the same foot over and over again.

 

2. How to keep the rhythm through longer runs

Don’t worry if you lose the rhythm. Maybe after breathing 10 times on the nose you need to breathe a few time through the mouth. It’s not a problem and not written in stone. Then get back in the rhythm.

 

3. How to practice the rhythm until it becomes natural

If you want nose breathing to be natural you have to close your mouth throughout the day and breathe through your nose. You might feel you cannot get enough oxygen.

However, how do you expect to be efficient breathing through your nose if you breathe through your mouth when you walk, sleep and do housework.

Breathe through your nose, that’s why it’s there, for you to use it for breathing.

 

4. How to allow more oxygen to come in through the nose

Relax. This is the “trick”. Forcing air in by tension your nose and face will only restrict the flow. Relax your face, mouth, nose and nostrils and allow the air free passage through your nose.

When you need to breathe in through the mouth just do it and then go back to using the nose. Even if you have a problem with the nose (i.e. sinus) and it restricts the breathing relaxing your nose and face can’t harm, but only help.

As mentioned before, you cannot expect to take it enough oxygen through the nose, to be efficient, if you don’t use it.

 

5. Abdominal breathing

Efficient breathing doesn’t only mean breathing through your nose but also breathing into the stomach without lifting your shoulder.

For runners the shoulders and level of tension in them impacts their performance almost instantly. Watch the video on how to relax the shoulders.

Watch the video below as I give examples and talk about other aspects as well. If you wish to attend our dedicated running workshops email support@themtechnique.com

Running Technique – Running And Lower Back Pain

running-technique-running-lower-back-pain

Lower back pain is very common and many cases are due to poor use of the body (i.e. poor alignment, posture, weak key muscles).

If you are running with lower back pain you should consider finding the source of your pain before you continue. While there are many reasons your lower back pain may hurt, such as weak core muscles or gluteal muscles, there can also be reasons related to your running technique, the mechanics side of running.

In the video I mention 3 aspects of the running technique that may contribute to your lower back pain.

1. THE HEAD

The head should not be tilts forwards or backwards. Instead is should be aligned with the shoulders, hips and front of ankles.

2. THE SHOULDERS

Shoulders should not go out of alignment with the ears and hips. Crossing the arms in front of your body will pull your shoulders forward, closing up your body, and causing your body to lose posture and good form.

3. THE HIP

a. The Bucket of Water

Imagine your hip joint like a bucket of water. In its strongest, stable and aligned position it is slightly tilted forward. However, the tendency is to tilt the hips too much forward (spilling water forward out of the bucket) or tilt backwards (spilling water backwards).

Keep the hip join in a position where you don’t spill water, neither forward, or backwards.

b. Heel strike

Heel striking when running is the perfect way to tilt the hips forward and throw them out of alignment. This put a lot of pressure on your lower back and makes the whole chain become unstable and weak.

 

Watch the video below and if you wish to attend our dedicated running workshops email support@themtechnique.com

Running Technique – Body Alignment And How It Affects Performance

Posture and body alignment are 2 topics you will hear me speak about very often. Why? Because a body out of alignment is weak. In the video I used 3 pots to make my point.

If any part of the body is out of alignment the body is an unstable and weak position. That being said the body is a moving system, so there will be movement, you cannot stiff up when you run either. However, movement and misalignment are different.

 

The correct body alignment, even if you lean slightly from the ankles (using gravity for forward movement) your body should be aligned, possibly at an angle, this way:

Imagine a STRAIGHT LINE from EAR to SHOULDER to HIP to ANKLE (in front of the ankle). 

That is what you want to keep throughout your run, walk, and pretty much anything you do. Again, there will be a slight movement of the joint, obviously, because the body is not glued together. In the same time you also need to relax. Having good alignment by stiffening the body will not be any better.

Sure your head won’t fall off as in the video, however you can clearly see how unstable the body is when out of alignment. When the body is unstable muscles will compensate for others which are not doing their job, joints will be put through more pressure than needed, injuries may take place in time and energy will be wasted.

Check out the video below and if you wish to attend our running workshops email support@themtechnique.com