Squats And Lunges – Why Should You Care About Body Weight Distribution

Everything you do is body weight distribution, and body weight transfer, as well as balancing (walking is balancing for example). Understand and practice these 3 concepts (and posture) and any exercise or movement you will ever do will be correct. But only if you practice these concepts.

 

Incorrect body weight distribution simply leads to:

  1. One side of the body will take more of the weight than the other. Thus chances are this side will be over worked, and muscles strained in the long run, while the other side will weaken.
  2. Stress injuries. If you walk, run, squat and lunge while one side of the body takes of weight, and so more of the aggressive impact, it will increase the risks of injuries. It may not happen this year or the next, but after years and years.
  3. Knee pain. This is very common particularly when squatting and lunging, but also standing, walking and running.

 

When we squat or lunge we are told “knees behind the toes!” Why??? Give the reason why. I’ll tell you why. When the knees go too far over the toes, your body weight distribution is lost. There is more weight going on the front of your feet, while you take the weight off the heels (even if heels are still on the ground). This causes the knees and ankles to take more and more pressure.

Now, that doesn’t mean that you bring the weight back on the heels and lift the toes of the ground. That’s not good either. The solution is The TRIPOD.

 

How to distribute your weight correctly

Every moment you stand, whatever you do, you will form a tripod with your feet.

THE TRIPOD = BIG TOE + LITTLE TOE + HEEL

When you stand, walk, run, squat, lunge, balance on one leg etc, keep The Tripod firmly rooted into the ground. That’s it. FOCUS.

If you need advice or would like to know more about coaching programs contact me.

 

Lunges – Common Mistakes And Correct Technique

The lunge is one of the most common exercises.

Being able to lunge means you have strong stability muscles, glutes, quads, core muscles, and so on.

People practice lunges for different reasons, some for rehabilitation, recovering from injuries while others want to have a toned butt.

When working with a physio for example, they ensure the technique is impeccable.

When we do it in the gym, with weights, and only for the purpose of fitness and toning up so we look good, technique is forgotten or ignored, or not even known. We just lunge around without even thinking about what we are doing. We just know the lunges are good for glutes and burns calories so it’s good enough. Or is it?

But it’s not your fault. Probably no one spent the time showing you how to actually do it.

Straight to the point, many people who lunge don’t know how to lunge.

 

Common mistakes in lunges

  • lunge is too short or too long
  • feet are on the same line (less stability)
  • front knee collapses in
  • front knee is shaky
  • front foot is unstable on the ground
  • leaning forward or back
  • jerky movements (particularly when stepping back but not only)
  • back knee is too low and the leg doesn’t have the necessary strength
  • body weight is wrongly distributed
  • aggressively pushing against the ground (particularly when stepping back)
  • stepping heel first
  • front heel coming off the ground
  • knees going over the toes
  • poor posture

Do you do any of these mistakes?

 

Consequences of incorrect lunges

  • knee pain (very common)
  • ankle pain
  • foot pain
  • back pain
  • shoulder pain
  • promoting poor posture
  • not training the right muscles, and straining others

 

Solutions for lunges mistakes

I don’t yet have a video with lunges technique, yet. So I will give you just a few technical point to focus on at your next training session.

  1. Have space between your legs to help with balance (you can place them on the same line later)
  2. The length of the lung is about 2x hip width (if while lunging your front heel comes off the ground the lunge is too short; if you have to lean forward to step the lunge is too long)
  3. Front foot is always on the ground, with the whole foot rooted on the floor (read about The Tripod here)
  4. Keep your body straight at all times – no leaning forward or back when you stand or step
  5. Front knee stays behind the toes

 

If you are having trouble with these elements then you need to do something before: lunge with the back heel on the ground. We need to strengthen stability muscles before doing a lunge with back heel off the ground in the correct way. Here’s what you can do:

  1. Have space between your legs to help with balance (you can place them on the same line later)
  2. The length of the lung is about 2x hip width (if while lunging your front heel comes off the ground the lunge is too short; if you have to lean forward to step the lunge is too long)
  3. Front foot is always on the ground, with the whole foot rooted on the floor (read about The Tripod here)
  4. Front knee stays behind the toes
  5. Place the back heel on the ground
  6. Bring the back foot right next to the front foot – keep knee bent, keep height the same and both heels on the ground
  7. Bring the back foot back and repeat

See picture attached to this article.

When the lunge with back heel on the ground becomes easy you can start the walking lunges. Alternatively you can hold onto something to perform the exercise and as you get stronger you can do it without holding.

 

I promise a video to attach to this article.

In the mean time if you are unsure about the technique contact me, there is no charge at all, we get on a call and I help you get these lunges done properly. Contact me here.